CANPAN ブログ検索
Loading
  • もっと見る
« 2022年05月 | Main | 2022年07月»
Blog Profile.jpg
Yohei Sasakawa
Profile
Twitter
Google
this blog www
<< 2022年06月 >>
      1 2 3 4
5 6 7 8 9 10 11
12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25
26 27 28 29 30    
What's New?
Categories
Monthly Archive
Comments
Links
https://blog.canpan.info/yoheisasakawa/index1_0.rdf
https://blog.canpan.info/yoheisasakawa/index2_0.xml
The Nippon Foundation Launches Fundraising Drive with U.S., Ukrainian Envoys to Assist Evacuees from Ukraine (1) [2022年06月29日(Wed)]
E99B86E59088E58699E79C9FEFBC91.jfif
At a press conference on June 13, 2022, to announce the launch of a 1 billion-yen fund to assist Ukrainian evacuees in Japan. In the front row, from left, is a family of Ukrainian evacuees: Ms. Oksana Bila and her children Mr. Mark Yelenets and Ms. Rimma Yelenets-Memor. At back, from left, is The Nippon Foundation Executive Director Jumpei Sasakawa, Ukrainian Ambassador to Japan Sergiy Korsunsky, and U.S. Ambassador to Japan Rahm Emanuel.


The Nippon Foundation, working in partnership with the U.S. and Ukrainian ambassadors to Japan, has launched a fundraising campaign to give additional financial support to Ukrainian evacuees in Japan.

Mr. Jumpei Sasakawa, executive director of the foundation, said at a press conference on June 13 that the Ukrainian Evacuees Assistance Fund has started to accept donations, aiming to raise 1 billion yen (about $ 7.4 million) by the end of September.

The fund was created after Jumpei, who happens to be my son, was approached by U.S. Ambassador to Japan Rahm Emanuel, who called and asked him if together they can enable ordinary Japanese to help support Ukrainians who fled their war-torn country to Japan

As of June 27, Japan is home to 1,407 Ukrainian evacuees, according to the Immigration Services Agency of Japan. This number is already much larger than we had originally expected and is still rising steadily.

Upon arrival in Japan, Ukrainian evacuees receive 90-day temporary visitor visas. But more than 80% of them apply to upgrade these to “designated activities” visas affording a year's residence and work eligibility because they expect to have to remain in Japan for an extended period of time. 

“Small donations from people around Japan will convey a feeling of welcome to evacuees arriving from Ukraine,” Jumpei said. The foundation will use these precious donations to support their Japanese language education to enable them to find jobs and lead fulfilling lives and to provide them with everyday items such as prepaid cards for public transportation.

We also plan to provide evacuees with opportunities to interact with local residents at festivals, firework displays, and sports events and to organize events where evacuees living in different parts of Japan can get together.

With administrative and other indirect costs being borne by the foundation, the entire amount of donations received will be used to support Ukrainian evacuees.

On March 28, The Nippon Foundation announced it would provide humanitarian assistance totaling 5.08 billion yen (about $37.6 million) over three years to help Ukrainians displaced by the Russian invasion of their homeland to come and live in Japan. Of this amount, 3.55 billion yen (about $26.3 million) is earmarked for their travel and living expenses and 1.53 billion yen (about $11.3 million) for NGOs working to support their daily lives.

As of June 14, the foundation had received applications for assistance on behalf of 1,031 Ukrainians, of whom 280 have so far received travel and living expenses.   

In deciding how to use the fund, we have taken into account the voices of Ukrainian evacuees receiving assistance about their uncertain future, such as: “I’m worried if I’ll be able to learn Japanese”; “I want to work, but I’m uncertain about the availability of jobs”; “I want to get away from daily life by spending time surrounded by nature”; and, “I want to see traditional buildings like shrines and learn more about Japanese culture.”

(To be continued)


new_pr_20220613_05.jpg
Mr. Jumpei Sasakawa, executive director of The Nippon Foundation, at a press conference on June 13, 2022, to announce the launch of a fund-raising drive to support Ukrainian evacuees.


new_pr_20220613_03.jpg
U.S. Ambassador to Japan Rahm Emanuel.


new_pr_20220613_04.jpg
Ukrainian Ambassador to Japan Sergiy Korsunsky.
Posted by Y.Sasakawa at 17:27 | FORGING GLOBAL TIES | URL | comment(0)
38th WHO Sasakawa Health Prize Goes to Dr. Ruamviboonsuk of Thailand [2022年06月25日(Sat)]
EFBC93E383BC.jfif
The 38th WHO Sasakawa Health Prize award ceremony in Geneva on May 27, 2022. From left: Mr. Ahmed Robleh Abdilleh, Health Minister of Djibouti and president of the 75th World Health Assembly; Dr. Paisan Ruamviboonsuk of Thailand, recipient of the award; WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus; and the author.


On the last leg of my two-week, four-nation tour which took me to Malaysia, East Timor, Poland and Switzerland, I attended a ceremony in Geneva on May 27 to present the 38th WHO Sasakawa Health Prize to Dr. Paisan Ruamviboonsuk of Thailand for his tireless work to combat blindness among diabetics.

The prize was established by my late father, Ryoichi Sasakawa, in 1984 to recognize individuals and organizations engaging in innovative efforts to improve people’s health and, at the same time, establishing greater equity in health through the promotion of primary health care.

This year’s award ceremony was held face-to-face for the first time in three years following virtual events during the past two years due to the COVID-19 pandemic. It took place at the historic Palais des Nations, which houses the United Nations Office at Geneva, in the presence of WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus and Mr. Ahmed Robleh Abdilleh, Health Minister of Djibouti and president of the 75th World Health Assembly, the WHO’s decision-making body, as well as health ministers and other representatives of member states and international organizations.

In honoring Dr. Ruamviboonsuk with the prize, I said: “The grading method he established for screening and detecting blindness, as well as his training of health care professionals, saved many from blindness in Thailand with a profound impact on health enhancement in the country.”

“I would like to express my respect to Dr. Ruamviboonsuk for going as far as improving Thailand’s health system through the practice of primary health care.”

I told the ceremony participants that I myself, as WHO Goodwill Ambassador for Leprosy Elimination, have visited 122 countries over the years in my global fight against leprosy, also known as Hansen’s disease. Even during the COVID-19 pandemic, ministers of health and others around the world have joined me in an awareness campaign called “Don’t forget leprosy” to help ensure that leprosy is not overlooked.

As one also working towards our shared goal of “health for all,” I again congratulated Dr. Ruamviboonsuk and wished him every success for the future.


EFBC92E7ACB9E5B79DE581A5E5BAB7E8B39EE68E88E8B39EE5BC8FE381A6E38299E381AEE382B9E38392E3829AE383BCE38381E291A1.jfif
Speaking at the 38th WHO Sasakawa Health Prize award ceremony in Geneva on May 27, 2022.


The text of my speech at the 38th WHO Sasakawa Health Prize award ceremony can be seen here.
Posted by Y.Sasakawa at 14:00 | FORGING GLOBAL TIES | URL | comment(0)
Honored by WHO Director-General’s Global Health Leaders Award (2) [2022年06月22日(Wed)]
DSC06159.jfif
The famed Nepalese mountaineer Mr. Mingma Gyabu Sherpa with a “Don’t Forget Leprosy” sign at the summit of Mount Everest on May 15, 2022. I included this photo in my video message for the WHO Director-General’s Global Health Leaders Awards ceremony on May 22 for my quest for leprosy-free world.


Since I was unable to attend the ceremony for the WHO Director-General’s Global Health Leaders Awards in Geneva on May 22, I prepared a video message in which I expressed my heartfelt gratitude for the prestigious honor and called on the delegates to the opening session of the 75th World Health Assembly to join me “on the last mile to end leprosy.”

“I still remember the faces of patients, who had been abandoned by their families and society, when I visited a leprosarium for the first time 46 years ago. They were empty of hope,” I said. “That’s when I began my fight against leprosy.”

In 2001, I was appointed as a WHO Goodwill Ambassador for Leprosy Elimination. Based on my belief that problems and their solutions are found in the field, I have traveled to more than 100 countries, spending time in jungles, deserts and mountains.

“Efforts to address the disease and the human rights issues associated with it have come down to the last mile. However, there is a saying in Japan: On a journey of 100 miles, 99 miles is only halfway,” I said.

Due to the spread of the novel coronavirus, activities against leprosy in many countries have had to be scaled back. The COVID-19 pandemic has also dealt a serious economic blow to individuals and communities of persons affected by leprosy, many of whom were already in a vulnerable position.

In light of the situation, I initiated a “Don’t forget leprosy” campaign in August 2021 to send the message that leprosy and those affected by the disease must not be overlooked even amid the COVID pandemic.

The “Don’t forget leprosy” campaign has consisted of a number of components. These include: webinars (the sixth was held on June 7); online media briefings; TV and radio spots; videos featuring my activities as WHO Goodwill Ambassador; and the annual Global Appeal to End Stigma and Discrimination against Persons Affected by Leprosy launched at the end of January.

The campaign was scheduled to run until the end of May 2022, but has been extended for another year due to the ongoing impact of the pandemic.

In my video message to the award ceremony, I shared with the audience a photo of the famed Nepalese mountaineer Mr. Mingma Gyabu Sherpa taken at the top of Mount Everest with a “Don’t Forget Leprosy” sign.

He is the youngest person to climb all 14 of the world’s mountains above 8,000 meters high and for holding the Guinness World Record for “fastest time to climb Everest and K2,” which he did within 61 days.

He reached the summit of Everest at 6:45 a.m. on May 15, 2022, and sent the message “Don’t forget leprosy” from the highest point on Earth. This was at the suggestion of Mr. Santa Bir Lama, president of the Nepal Mountaineering Association (NMA), who with funding support from The Nippon Foundation has helped Nepal push forward in its drive to eliminate leprosy.

I truly appreciate their support.

(End)


The text of my video message to receive the WHO Director-General’s Global Health Leaders Awards can be seen here.

This video message is available from here.
Posted by Y.Sasakawa at 10:00 | LEPROSY | URL | comment(0)
Honored by WHO Director-General’s Global Health Leaders Award (1) [2022年06月21日(Tue)]
It was a great honor for me to be recognized with the WHO Director-General’s Global Health Leaders Award 2022 for my “forty years of commitment to fighting leprosy and the stigma and social discrimination it carries.”

I was one of six individuals and groups from across the world to receive the award, which was established in 2019 to recognize “outstanding contributions to advancing global health, demonstrated leadership and commitment to regional health issues.”

The awards ceremony was held in Geneva on May 22 as part of the live-streamed high-level opening session of the 75th World Health Assembly, the WHO’s decision-making body.

In presenting the awards, WHO Director-General Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said: “At a time when the world is facing an unprecedented convergence of inequity, conflict, food insecurity, the climate crisis and a pandemic, this award recognizes those who have made an outstanding contribution to protecting and promoting health around the world,” adding that these awardees “embody lifelong dedication, relentless advocacy, a commitment to equity, and selfless service of humanity.”

As I was en route from Malaysia to Geneva in the course of a two-week, four-nation tour, Dr. Takahiro Nanri, executive director of the Sasakawa Health Foundation, received the award on my behalf.

Director-General Tedros noted that as WHO Goodwill Ambassador for Leprosy Elimination and Japan’s Ambassador for the Human Rights of Persons Affected by leprosy, I have visited many countries to advocate for leprosy control with national leaders and policy-makers, but added: “He has also made a point of meeting people affected by leprosy, in some of the most disadvantaged groups.”

“We are grateful for Mr. Sasakawa’s dedication to working with WHO to reduce and in some countries even eliminate leprosy and to stand up for human rights,” he said.

The other recipients of the award were:

Accredited Social Health Activists (ASHA), the more than 1 million female volunteers in India who play a crucial role in linking the community with the health system. ‘Asha’ means hope in Hindi.

Dr. Paul Farmer, who passed away in his sleep in February, was chair of the Department of Global Health and Social Medicine at Harvard Medical School and co-founder of Partners in Health.

Dr. Ahmed Hankir, a British-Lebanese psychiatrist, is a senior research fellow at the Centre for Mental Health Research in association with Cambridge University and academic clinical fellow in psychiatry at King’s College London.

Ms. Ludmila Sofia Oliveira Varela, a youth sports advocate from Cabo Verde and a member of the Cabo Verde national volleyball team, has worked to facilitate access to sports for all, providing a healthy alternative to risky behaviors among young people.

Also honored were eight volunteer polio workers who were shot and killed by armed gunmen in Takhar and Kunduz provinces in Afghanistan on February 24, 2022. Four of the victims were women. The eight volunteers were reaching thousands of children through house-to-house campaigns in north-eastern Afghanistan.

(To be continued)
Posted by Y.Sasakawa at 13:02 | LEPROSY | URL | comment(0)
【Photo Diary】 (7) Visit to Geneva in the course of 4-nation tour [2022年06月15日(Wed)]
I would like to share with you some of the photographs taken during my four-nation tour that took me to Malaysia, East Timor, Switzerland and Poland from May 16 to 29, 2022.

[May 27, Geneva, Switzerland]


EFBC91E38386E38388E38299E383ADE382B9WHOE4BA8BE58B99E5B180E995B7.jfif
Returning to Geneva from Poland, I meet with WHO Director-General Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus during the 75th World Health Assembly, which I was attending in my capacity as WHO Goodwill Ambassador for Leprosy Elimination.


EFBC92E7ACB9E5B79DE581A5E5BAB7E8B39EE68E88E8B39EE5BC8FE381A6E38299E381AEE382B9E38392E3829AE383BCE38381E291A1.jfif
Speaking at a ceremony to present the 38th WHO Sasakawa Health Prize to Dr. Paisan Ruamviboonsuk of Thailand for his tireless work to combat blindness among diabetics. The award was established in 1984 by my late father, Ryoichi Sasakawa, to recognize notable advances made in the promotion of primary health care throughout the world.


EFBC93E383BC.jfif
(From left) Mr. Ahmed Robleh Abdilleh, Health Minister of Djibouti and President of the 75th World Health Assembly; Dr. Paisan Ruamviboonsuk of Thailand, recipient of the 38th WHO Sasakawa Health Prize Award; WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus; and the author.


EFBC94Mr.20Zahid20MalekE3838FE38299E383B3E382AFE38299E383A9E38386E38299E382B7E383A5E4BF9DE581A5E5A4A7E887A3.jfif
Meeting with Mr. Zahid Malek, Health and Family Welfare Minister of Bangladesh.


EFBC95Dr.20Tinte20ItinteangE382ADE383AAE3838FE38299E382B9E4BF9DE581A5E5A4A7E887A3.jfif
Meeting with Dr. Tinte Itinteang, Health and Medical Services Minister of Kiribati.


EFBC96Dr.20Lia20Tadesse20GebremedhinE382A8E38381E382AAE38392E3829AE382A2E4BF9DE581A5E5A4A7E887A3.jfif
Meeting with Dr. Lia Tadesse Gebremedhin, Health Minister of Ethiopia.


EFBC97Mr.20Todd20HowlandE59BBDE980A3E4BABAE6A8A9E9AB98E7AD89E5BC81E58B99E5AE98E4BA8BE58B99E68980E38381E383BCE38395.jfif
Meeting with Mr. Todd Howland, Chief, Development, Economic and Social Rights Branch, Office of the U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights.


EFBC98Dr.20Carissa20F.20Etienne20202020WHOE6B18EE382A2E383A1E383AAE382ABE59CB0E59F9FE4BA8BE58B99E68980E5B180E995B7.jfif
Meeting with Dr. Carissa F. Etienne, director of the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO), which serves as the WHO’s Regional Office for the Americas.

(To be continued)
read more...
Posted by Y.Sasakawa at 10:00 | URL | comment(0)
【Photo Diary】 (6) Visit to Poland in the course of 4-nation tour [2022年06月14日(Tue)]
I would like to share with you some of the photographs taken during my four-nation tour that took me to Malaysia, East Timor, Switzerland and Poland from May 16 to 29, 2022.

[May 26, Kraków, Poland]


1-b4967.jpg
With Ms. Lily Klaudia Adamowicz, a 2016-17 fellow from Poland who studied at the Inter-University Center for Japanese Language Studies (IUC) in Yokohama, south of Tokyo, under The Nippon Foundation Fellows Program. This is a 10-month program for Ph.D. students in all fields of Japanese studies, targeting promising young scholars who exhibit a deep linguistic and cultural knowledge of the country.


unnamed-28935.jpg
With faculty members of Jagiellonian University in Kraków, the country’s oldest university established in 1364. For the last 35 years, the foundation has supported the university under the Ryoichi Sasakawa Young Leaders Fellowship Fund (Sylff) program for its MA and doctoral candidates. At left are Vice-Rector for Educational Affairs Professor Armen Edigarian and Professor Paweł Laidler, chairman of the Sylff steering committee.  We explored the possibility of having Japanese student volunteers who are being sent to Poland to support displaced Ukrainians work alongside their peers at the university.

(To be continued)
Posted by Y.Sasakawa at 10:00 | FORGING GLOBAL TIES | URL | comment(0)
【Photo Diary】 (5) Visit to Poland in the course of 4-nation tour [2022年06月13日(Mon)]
I would like to share with you some of the photographs taken during my four-nation tour that took me to Malaysia, East Timor, Switzerland and Poland from May 16 to 29, 2022.

[May 25, Kraków, Poland, and Medyka on the border with Ukraine]


E291A0E382A6E382AFE383A9E382A4E3838AE381A8E381AEE59BBDE5A283E6B2BFE38184EFBC88E383A1E38386E38299E382A3E382ABE59CB0E58CBA-MedykaEFBC89E381ABE38182E3828BE4B880E69982E981BFE99BA3E5A0B4E68980.jfif
Arriving at a humanitarian aid camp in Medyka, a village in southeastern Poland on the border with Ukraine. This is a temporary transit center for Ukrainians fleeing their war-torn country where they can stay briefly before moving on to other places in Poland and elsewhere. Since the conflict erupted, Polish officials have consistently referred to Medyka as the busiest border crossing with Ukraine.


E291A1E3838EE383ABE382A6E382A7E383BCE381AEE59BA3E4BD93E3838FE3829AE383A9E382AFE383ABE383BC.EFBC88paracrewEFBC89E381AEE3839EE382A4E382AFE4BBA3E8A1A8E381ABE6A188E58685E38197E381A6E38282E38289E38186JPG.jfif
Mike, a member of Paracrew, an international humanitarian response organization registered in Norway, gives me a tour of the relief camp.


E291A2E4B880E69982E69C9FE38288E3828AE381AFE981BFE99BA3E6B091E381AFE6B89BE381A3E3819FE381A8E38184E38186.jfif
The number of Ukrainian evacuees passing through this border crossing in Medyka is said to have declined somewhat.


E291A3E981BFE99BA3E6B091E58F97E38191E585A5E3828CE382BBE383B3E382BFE383BCE38292E8A68BE5ADA6.jfif
Visiting a temporary transit center for displaced Ukrainians in Medyka at the site of a former Tesco supermarket.


E291A4E981BFE99BA3E6B091E58F97E38191E585A5E3828CE69982E381AEE58F97E4BB98E38082E6AF8EE697A55000E4BABAE4BBA5E4B88AE3818BE38299E69DA5E381A6E38184E3828BE381A8E381AEE38193E381A8E38082.jfif
A reception desk that more than 5,000 Ukrainian evacuees still pass through daily.


E291A5E383A8E383BCE383ADE38383E3838FE3829AE585A8E59C9FE3818BE38289E5AF84E4BB98E3818BE38299E381A8E38197E381A6E5B18AE38184E3819FE38282E381AEE38292E58089E5BAABE381A6E38299E7AEA1E79086.jfif
A warehouse to store and manage aid sent from across Europe.


E291A6E382BBE383B3E382BFE383BCE381A6E38299E5838DE3818FE3839BE38299E383A9E383B3E38386E382A3E382A2E3839FE383BCE38386E382A3E383B3E382AFE38299E381ABE58F82E58AA0.jfif
Joining a meeting of volunteers working at the transit center.


E291A7E59BBDE5A283E38292E8B68AE38188E3828BE3819FE38281E381AEE7A88EE996A2E38292E9809AE9818EE38199E3828BE3819FE38281E381AB48E69982E99693E5BE85E381A4E38193E381A8E38282E38182E3828BE381A8E38184E38186.jpg
It sometimes takes 48 hours for these trucks to go through the customs on the Ukraine-Poland border.

(To be continued)
Posted by Y.Sasakawa at 11:10 | FORGING GLOBAL TIES | URL | comment(0)
15 Japanese Student Volunteers Leave for Poland to Assist Displaced Ukrainians (2) [2022年06月10日(Fri)]
en_new_art_20220530_02.jpg
Ms. Rinka Saito of Waseda University, who was born with a hearing impairment and is among the first group of volunteers, says she can imagine how anxious evacuees with disabilities must feel living in temporary shelters.


At the May 30 ceremony to send off Japanese student volunteers to provide humanitarian assistance to Ukrainian evacuees, Ms. Rinka Saito of Waseda University, representing the first group of volunteers, said that as a person born with a hearing impairment who uses a cochlear implant, she can imagine how anxious evacuees with disabilities must feel living in temporary shelters.

“I sincerely hope that through our activities there, we can lessen the anxiety and inconvenience they are experiencing and provide them with at least some relief,” she said.

From the second group, Mr. Koya Fujita of Doshisha University, said: “When I learned of the tense situation in Ukraine, where people who had been leading peaceful daily lives were losing their homes and livelihoods and being forced to flee their homeland, I wondered if there was anything I could do to help them, and decided to apply for this program.”

As an international politics major hoping to study abroad, he said he will strive to understand the evacuees’ situation as much as possible and keep in mind their feelings and point of view as he engages in his activities.

I spoke at the ceremony the day after I came back from a two-week four-nation tour, which took me to Malaysia, East Timor, Switzerland and Poland.

In Poland, I visited Kraków and Medyka, a village in south-eastern Poland on the border with Ukraine, to lay the groundwork for the dispatch of these volunteers by visiting humanitarian aid camps and meeting with representatives of international NGOs working there.

I want the Japanese student volunteers to work with students of Jagiellonian University in Kraków, the country’s oldest university established in 1364, in assisting displaced Ukrainians. The Nippon Foundation has supported the university under the Ryoichi Sasakawa Young Leaders Fellowship Fund (Sylff) program for its MA and doctoral candidates for the last 35 years.

If time permits, I suggested that they visit the Auschwitz-Birkenau Memorial and Museum in southern Poland, the site of the Nazi concentration and death camp−the largest mass murder site in history where more than one million people lost their lives during World War II.

Due to the constantly changing situation surrounding the war in Ukraine, we want to be flexible in pressing ahead with our aid plans. But I told the ceremony participants that The Nippon Foundation puts the safety of the student volunteers first and foremost, and will make every effort to ensure that these young people are able to engage in fulfilling activities.

(End)


en_new_art_20220530_03.jpg
Mr. Koya Fujita of Doshisha University, representing the second group of volunteers, said as an international politics major hoping to study abroad, he will try to understand the evacuees’ situation as much as possible and keep in mind their feelings and their point of view.
Posted by Y.Sasakawa at 10:00 | FORGING GLOBAL TIES | URL | comment(0)
15 Japanese Student Volunteers Leave for Poland to Assist Displaced Ukrainians (1) [2022年06月09日(Thu)]
en_new_art_20220530_01.jpg
At a ceremony on May 30, 2022, to send off Japanese student volunteers to Poland to assist Ukrainian evacuees. The first group left Tokyo on May 31 and the second group is set to depart on June 14. The Nippon Foundation will send five more groups by October, with the total of volunteers reaching 105.


A group of 15 Japanese student volunteers left Tokyo for Poland on May 31 on a mission to provide humanitarian assistance to Ukrainians, including those with disabilities, displaced by the continued Russian military attacks.

This is the first of seven 15-member groups of volunteers to be dispatched for two weeks each until October by The Nippon Foundation and its partner organization, the Nippon Foundation Volunteer Center, to Poland and other countries neighboring Ukraine.

As far as I know, this is the first time in the world that student volunteers are being sent in organized groups to support displaced Ukrainians in the current conflict.

Based in the city of Kraków in southern Poland, these volunteers will work at humanitarian aid camps on the border with Ukraine to assist people, including those with disabilities, who have fled the war-torn country through distribution of medical supplies, food and other items, management of relief supplies, and dissemination of information.

Speaking at a ceremony at The Nippon Foundation on May 30 to send off the first two groups, I said I had been encouraged by the large numbers of applicants--112 for the first group and 117 for the second−which I felt has clearly put paid to the stereotype that Japanese youths are inward-looking and reluctant to go and work aboard.

The Nippon Foundation Volunteer Center is now accepting applications for the remaining five groups scheduled to depart between August and October, which will bring the total number of volunteers to 105. (No groups are being dispatched in July due to university examinations in Japan). The first group is scheduled to come back from Poland on June 16 while the second is set to depart for Europe on June 14 and return home on June 29.

(To be continued)


en_new_art_20220530_04.jpg
Speaking at the send-off ceremony on May 30, 2022, I said I was encouraged by the large number of applicants for volunteers to go to Poland to support displaced Ukrainians.
Posted by Y.Sasakawa at 10:00 | FORGING GLOBAL TIES | URL | comment(0)
【Photo Diary】 (4) Visit to Geneva in the Course of 4-Nation Tour [2022年06月06日(Mon)]
I would like to share with you some of the photographs taken during my four-nation tour that took me to Malaysia, East Timor, Switzerland and Poland from May 16 to 29, 2022.


[May 23, Geneva, Switzerland]


E291A0E58FB3E3818BE38289AFROE381AEDr20IMPOUMA20BenidoE38081E7AD86E88085E38081DR.20CABORE2C20Waogodo20Joseph.jfif
Meeting with officials of WHO Regional Office for Africa (AFRO): From left, Dr. Joseph Waogodo Cabore, the author, and Dr. Benido Impouma.


E291A1E3839EE383B3E382B9E382AFE383BBE3839EE383B3E382BFE38299E38392E38299E383A4E383BBE382A4E383B3E38388E38299E4BF9DE581A5E5A4A7E887A3.jfif
Meeting with Dr. Mansukh Mandaviya, Indian Minister of Health and Family Welfare.


[May 24, Geneva]


EFBC91Ms.20Ingvild20Kjerkol20E3838EE383ABE382A6E382A7E383BCE4BF9DE581A5E5A4A7E887A3.jfif
Ms. Ingvild Kjerkol, Norwegian Minister of Health and Care Services.


EFBC92Dr.20Armindo20Daniel20TiagoE383A2E382B5E38299E383B3E38392E38299E383BCE382AFE4BF9DE581A5E5A4A7E887A3.jfif
Meeting with Dr. Armindo Daniel Tiago, Health Minister of Mozambique.


EFBC93Mr.20Pierre20N'gou20DimbaE382B3E383BCE38388E382B7E38299E3839BE38299E382A2E383BCE383ABE4BF9DE581A5E5A4A7E887A3.jfif
Meeting with Mr. Pierre N’Gou Dimba, Cote d’Ivoire Minister of Health, Public Hygiene and Universal Health Coverage.


4E38395E3829AE383BCE3838AE383A0E383BBE382B7E383B3SEAROE4BA8BE58B99E5B180E995B7.jfif
Meeting with Dr. Poonam Khetrapal Singh, WHO Regional Director for South-East Asia.


EFBC95Mr.20Birodh20KhatiwadaE3838DE3838FE3829AE383BCE383ABE4BF9DE581A5E5A4A7E887A3.jfif
Meeting with Mr. Birodh Khatiwada, Nepalese Minister for Health and Population.


EFBC96Dr.20Osagie20E.20Ehanire20E3838AE382A4E382B7E38299E382A7E383AAE382A2E4BF9DE581A5E5A4A7E887A3.jfif
Meeting with Dr. E. Osagie Ehanire, Health Minister of Nigeria.


7Hon.Elizabeth20AchueiE58D97E382B9E383BCE382BFE38299E383B3E585B1E5928CE59BBDE4BF9DE581A5E5A4A7E887A3.jfif
Meeting with South Sudan’s Health Minister Elizabeth Achuei.


EFBC98Dr.20Max20Rein20RondonuwuE382A4E383B3E38388E38299E3838DE382B7E382A2E4BF9DE581A5E6ACA1E5AE98.jfif
Meeting with Dr. Maxi Rein Rondonuwu, Directorate General of Prevention and Disease Control, the Indonesian Health Ministry.


EFBC99Mr.20Marcus20SamoE3839FE382AFE383ADE3838DE382B7E382A2E4BF9DE581A5E5A4A7E887A3.jfif
Meeting with Mr. Marcus Samo, Secretary of Health and Social Affairs of Micronesia.


EFBC91EFBC90Dr.20Marcelo20QueirogaE38395E38299E383A9E382B7E38299E383ABE4BF9DE581A5E5A4A7E887A3.jfif
Meeting with Dr. Marcelo Queiroga, Health Minister of Brazil.


(To be continued)
Posted by Y.Sasakawa at 10:00 | FORGING GLOBAL TIES | URL | comment(0)
| next